Anthony

November 7, 2011
84 Speedwell Avenue
Morristown, NJ 07960
  • Cost: $$
  • Alcohol: BYO
  • Parking: Street, Metered
  • Take Out: Yes

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November 7, 2011

Review

Filet Mignon Kebab with Basmati Rice

Persian food is unique within the broad category of “Middle Eastern” cuisine. Morristown’s Marjan is on the short but growing list of New Jersey restaurants serving authentic Persian specialties.

On the menu, you’ll find dolmeh (stuffed grape leaves), various kebabs (chicken, lamb, ground meat, filet mignon and even cornish hen), basmati rice dishes like Shirin Polo (with saffron, almonds, orange peel, carrots and pistachios), and hearty stews like Koresht-e-Fesenjoon (chicken with pomegranate sauce and crushed walnuts). The hummus we started with was less seasoned than we like it. The kebabs are much better, served with fluffy saffron-flavored rice. The slow cooked lamb shank braised in tomato sauce, however, was the big winner at our table.

Braised Lamb Shank

A comfortable spot with friendly service, Marjan is a small, family-run storefront that’s BYO. It’s easy to grab a bottle of wine a few stores down to enjoy with your meal.


2 Responses to “Marjan Persian Grill”

  1. rick says:

    i need to know why there is flag on your site when our restaurant name comes up did anyone asked your company to add that flag as indicatores of our restaurant. please remove it as some people may consider that political subject and we do not wish that happened to our establishment. thanks rick manesh

    • Anthony says:

      Rick,

      Thanks for your question. I understand your concern.

      Let me use your question as an opportunity to explain EthnicNJ.com’s thinking about the use of flags. Our mission is to find New Jersey’s best ethnic food. The EthnicNJ food map is a tool to help people find restaurants quickly and the flag markers are an easy way to distinguish ethnic cuisines. The national flags on the site are geographic references, not political statements about current national governments. Using the current national flag of the People’s Republic of China for “Chinese” restaurants, for example, is a geographic reference, not a statement about the Chinese government.

      At the same time, EthnicNJ.com wants to promote and support New Jersey’s best ethnic restaurants. Since you believe it may be detrimental to your business (and there are relatively few Persian restaurants in New Jersey), is there an alternative flag that would be an appropriate geographic reference for Persian cuisine? If there is, let me know (anthony@ethnicnj.com), and we will consider changing the flag marker for Marjan.

      Anthony

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